Finalists feel the pain

A new survey has reported that 59% students currently taking exams eat increased amounts of junk food while studying.

A new survey has reported that 59% students currentlytaking exams eat increased amounts of junk food while studying.
Consuming increased quantities of junk food is often connected with over-eating in order to cope with stress.
A second survey highlighted the fact that 1/5 of all students claim to have experienced anxiety attacks during the exam period, as well as 61% suffering from an inability to sleep and 51% from migraines.
Much of this stress can be traced back to the fact that 78% of students believe that the results of their exams will influence their career prospects upon leaving university.
Despite the health warnings that suggest increased junk food can actually lead to decreased productivity, 64% of students claim to be eating more chocolate, 61% are drinking more tea or coffee and 32% are drinking more energy drinks than normal.
Those finalists suffering from a lack of sleep may be unsurprised to hear that high levels of caffeine can drastically disrupt normal sleeping patterns.
Sam Hawkins, an English finalist, commented, “Some people ate lots more during revision, and some of that was probably food that’s not great for you, but some people found that they didn’t feel like eating because they were too stressed. 
“I’d say the more surprising thing was that only 20% of students say they suffered from anxiety attacks. Pretty much everyone I know has been incredibly stressed and anxious in the months before finals.”
One first-year student studying for Prelims said, “I know it’s not my finals, but it still feels like there’s a lot riding on these exams. Without a bike, I simply haven’t got time to go to Tesco’s all the time so why not just use the vending machine?”
Oliver Brann, editor of studentbeans.com stated, “With so much riding on exam results, including breaking into an already challenging job market, it seems students are putting their health at risk”.
An additional study however, conducted by Queen Margaret University, claims to have identified a possible solution: a daily drink of pomegranate juice.
Their study revealed that the juice caused a significant reduction in the level of the stress hormone cortisol in saliva and a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all volunteers.
The study also reports that most subjects, upon consumption, felt less distressed, nervous and guilty about the stress surrounding their particular workplace.

Consuming increased quantities of junk food is often connected with over-eating in order to cope with stress.

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A second survey highlighted the fact that 1/5 of all students claim to have experienced anxiety attacks during the exam period, as well as 61% suffering from an inability to sleep and 51% from migraines.

Much of this stress can be traced back to the fact that 78% of students believe that the results of their exams will influence their career prospects upon leaving university.

Despite the health warnings that suggest increased junk food can actually lead to decreased productivity, 64% of students claim to be eating more chocolate, 61% are drinking more tea or coffee and 32% are drinking more energy drinks than normal.

Those finalists suffering from a lack of sleep may be unsurprised to hear that high levels of caffeine can drastically disrupt normal sleeping patterns.

Sam Hawkins, an English finalist, commented, “Some people ate lots more during revision, and some of that was probably food that’s not great for you, but some people found that they didn’t feel like eating because they were too stressed.

“I’d say the more surprising thing was that only 20% of students say they suffered from anxiety attacks. Pretty much everyone I know has been incredibly stressed and anxious in the months before finals.”

One first-year student studying for Prelims said, “I know it’s not my finals, but it still feels like there’s a lot riding on these exams. Without a bike, I simply haven’t got time to go to Tesco’s all the time so why not just use the vending machine?”

Oliver Brann, editor of studentbeans.com stated, “With so much riding on exam results, including breaking into an already challenging job market, it seems students are putting their health at risk”.

An additional study however, conducted by Queen Margaret University, claims to have identified a possible solution: a daily drink of pomegranate juice.

Their study revealed that the juice caused a significant reduction in the level of the stress hormone cortisol in saliva and a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all volunteers.

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The study also reports that most subjects, upon consumption, felt less distressed, nervous and guilty about the stress surrounding their particular workplace.