Authors Posts by Meha Razdan

Meha Razdan

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Changing the course of history

Our reimagination of classic works reflects our new priorities

The art of painting like a child

The idea of enjoying something linked to childhood is apparently shameful

Childhood’s Clarity in ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’

The Ocean at the End of the Lane opens with an epigraph from Maurice Sendak, “I remember my own childhood vividly… I knew terrible things. But I knew I mustn’t let adults know I knew. It would scare them.”

Judge representative films on merit not just diversity

The films of women and POC must be judged meritocratically and not just for their representation

Self-publishing can counter literary elitism

Self-publishing is not a new phenomenon in the literary world; authors ranging from Marcel Proust to Beatrix Potter self-published books that are now integral...

Let’s talk about: Imposter Syndrome

Meha Razdan faces the feeling that you don’t belong

A Letter To: Singles on Valentine’s Day

Meha Razdan gives you her words of wisdom

Oxford’s obsession with public ‘wokeness’

Mera Razdan reveals the dangers of performative activism

Lets talk about: cultural appropriation

Cultures are not merely fashionable accessories

An open letter to Santa

Ditch the coal, carrots and chimney-creeping Mr Claus – this year you're on the naughty list

Popular

Access denied: Oxford admits more Westminster pupils than black students

First-ever undergraduate admissions report reveals stark realities of Oxford's access problem

Oxford to expand access programmes after data release

The scheme, which provides spring and summer schools for students from under-represented backgrounds, will increase its intake by 50% from next year

Confusions – Review

More energetic performances were needed to do justice to the subtlety of Alan Ayckbourn’s comedy

Medea – Preview

A production that promises a masterful portrayal of the struggles of integration, womanhood and belonging

Review – A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The humour, wit and emotional depth contained within the text are lost to the physicality and slapstick