“A woman sitting alone, doing nothing”

Tilly Nevin reviews Mary Ruefle’s stunning and startling new collection 'My Private Property'

Were the Nazis on drugs?

The Nazi regime was permeated with drugs, from morphine to heroin, taken by almost everyone in the Reich, from soldiers to housewives. This shocking...

Normal People Review – ‘a novel that speaks to the current...

Jenny Scoones discusses the portrayal of masculinity and friendship in Sally Rooney's second novel

Remembering Wallace: Biography and Memory

'The End of the Tour' is a powerful biopic, but by all accounts it gets David Foster Wallace wrong. Does that matter?

Science fiction that shaped the Revolution

Daniel Antonio Villar looks at the impact of Red Star, by Alexander Bognadov

Alain de Botton: “The university system is failing people”

Author Alain de Botton, founder of the School of Life, talks philosophy, mental health and the education system

Author of the week: Paul Beatty

A look at the winner of the 2016 Man Booker Prize

Not Forgetting William Hazlitt

Despite critical acclaim, William Hazlitt is now scarcely read.

Love in a Renault Clio

Susannah Goldsbrough outlines Nancy Mitford’s tragic wit

Modern China from a new perspective

Jacob Cheli talks to BBC Correspondent Michael Bristow about his travels around China with a cross-dressing language teacher

Popular

Police looking into Nazi salutes at Bannon protests

An Oxford student filmed the men who were part of a counter-protest

Autumn by Ali Smith: a seasonal portrait of post-Brexit Britain

The first book in Smith's ongoing quartet reminds us that sympathy is possible in our polarised times

‘Widows’ is a celebration of female grit and resolve

Viola Davis leads a group of kick-ass women in a heist film with a lot on its mind

England’s stubborn faith in Keaton Jennings reaps its reward

The ECB must explore ways to promote the lost art of Test batsmanship at a grassroots level

Salome Review – ‘struggles to take audience into another world’

Tea Party Productions' 'Salome' shows the play's continuing power to unsettle