Katherine Mansfield: The implosion of femininity

Priya Khaira-Hanks explores the enduring appeal of Katherine Mansfield's short stories in a modern woman's world

Project 1917: The revolution will be tweeted

The historical Project 1917 is bringing new life to the Russian Revolution, writes Lucy Enderby

The legend of Sherlock Holmes

Erin O'Neill explores the iconic status of Arthur Conan Doyle's literary creation

We need diverse books now more than ever

Sally Christmas reflects on the importance of diverse literature in the current political climate

Not Forgetting William Hazlitt

Despite critical acclaim, William Hazlitt is now scarcely read.

Modern China from a new perspective

Jacob Cheli talks to BBC Correspondent Michael Bristow about his travels around China with a cross-dressing language teacher

On the incompleteness of reading

Ellie Duncan gets lost in the countless possibilities of translation

The life and death of the millennial author

Daniel Curtis considers the implications of social media for literary legacies

Iris Murdoch’s Oxford Life

Benn Sheridan reflects on Iris Murdoch's life and work in the final instalment of Through the Looking Glass

House of Fear and the reinvention of fairytale

Libby Cherry writes about the feminist undertones to Leonora Carrington's The Hearing Trumpet

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Aung San Suu Kyi’s honorary degree should be revoked

If the degree was awarded to honour human rights, can it not be revoked to honour human rights?

The government is wrong to dismiss abortion clinic buffer zones

Protests outside abortion clinics are a form of harassment which undermine the free choices of women

Tolkien fans visit Oxford to celebrate author

The four-day event will include a Hobbit bake-off

Exclusive: Jude Law to speak at Union

The BAFTA-winning actor will appear with Jeremy Gilley, founder of Peace One Day, to promote the initiative, which works for an annual day of ceasefire and non-violence worldwide

Oxford historian discovers new letter sent by suffragette

The letter was written in 1905 by Annie Kenney, the first suffragette to be imprisoned in the campaign for the vote