OUSU is seeking to make the distribution of the Exam Regulations book 
online-only. Thousands of copies of 
the book are printed each year, and 
OUSU argues that the environmental 
and financial costs of the printing 
and distribution of this book are unacceptable given the book’s limited 
use.
The book contains regulations for 
undergraduate and postgraduate 
qualifications, as well as information 
on term dates and for visiting students. Most of the content of the book 
is not applicable to each student, and 
all of the information contained in 
the book is already available online. 
The book is updated each year.
In first week OUSU passed a motion 
to make the distribution of the Exam 
Regulations book online only, and 
is now asking academic affairs officers to pass similar motions through 
their JCRs. If successful, the University will stop printing the Examination 
Regulations book altogether.
David Messling, OUSU Vice-President told Cherwell, “OUSU is working with the University to establish 
a fully functional online version of 
the Exam Regulations which can replace the current ‘door stop’. In the 
meantime we’re encouraging JCRs to 
follow the lead of colleges who have 
stopped distributing the Grey Book 
to all Freshers, and instead are keeping a few strategically positioned 
copies in libraries and common 
rooms, thus reducing demand and 
gradually eliminating the need to 
supply 10,500 copies a year!
The motion is supported by several 
colleges. Tom Rutland, President of 
Jesus JCR and OUSU President-elect, 
said, “We passed this motion through 
our JCR earlier this year and it passed 
through the relevant college committees also. Whilst the University 
has been slow to act on this issue, individual colleges can help speed up 
the process by not ordering the exam 
regulations for their students.”
Natasha Rees, Hertford Academic 
Affairs Officer, commented, “Perhaps 
80 of the 1125 pages are relevant to 
any one student, and many of the 
regulations change on a yearly basis, 
so the Grey Book is not relevant beyond first year. The whole, up-to-date 
Exam Regulations is available online, 
and in Hertford, every JCR student 
has access to the internet in college 
accommodation. Thus I would say 
that issuing each fresher with a copy 
of the Grey Book is rather a waste of 
money and paper.”
A spokesperson for the University said that printing the grey book 
would be reviewed in future, stating, “There is an online version of 
the Exam Regulations book: since 
this online version was introduced 
in 2006, the print run of the Exam 
Regulations book has been reduced 
by about one quarter and work is already well advanced on an improved 
online version with better functionality. This new version will be online 
as soon as possible – maybe as early as 
n

OUSU is seeking to make the distribution of the Exam Regulations book online-only.

Thousands of copies of the book are printed each year, and OUSU argues that the environmental and financial costs of the printing and distribution of this book are unacceptable given the book’s limited use.

The book contains regulations for undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications, as well as information on term dates and for visiting students. Most of the content of the book is not applicable to each student, and all of the information contained in the book is already available online. The book is updated each year.

In first week OUSU passed a motion to make the distribution of the Exam Regulations book online only, and is now asking academic affairs officers to pass similar motions through their JCRs. If successful, the University will stop printing the Examination Regulations book altogether.

David Messling, OUSU Vice-President told Cherwell, “OUSU is working with the University to establish a fully functional online version of the Exam Regulations which can replace the current ‘door stop’. In the meantime we’re encouraging JCRs to follow the lead of colleges who have stopped distributing the Grey Book to all Freshers, and instead are keeping a few strategically positioned copies in libraries and common rooms, thus reducing demand and gradually eliminating the need to supply 10,500 copies a year!’

The motion is supported by several colleges. Tom Rutland, President of Jesus JCR and OUSU President-elect, said, “We passed this motion through our JCR earlier this year and it passed through the relevant college committees also. Whilst the University has been slow to act on this issue, individual colleges can help speed up the process by not ordering the exam regulations for their students.”

Natasha Rees, Hertford Academic Affairs Officer, commented, “Perhaps 80 of the 1125 pages are relevant to any one student, and many of the regulations change on a yearly basis, so the Grey Book is not relevant beyond first year. The whole, up-to-date Exam Regulations is available online, and in Hertford, every JCR student has access to the internet in college accommodation. Thus I would say that issuing each fresher with a copy of the Grey Book is rather a waste of money and paper.”

A spokesperson for the University said that printing the grey book would be reviewed in future, stating, “There is an online version of the Exam Regulations book: since this online version was introduced in 2006, the print run of the Exam Regulations book has been reduced by about one quarter and work is already well advanced on an improved online version with better functionality. This new version will be online as soon as possible – maybe as early as next year.’