Friday, April 16, 2021
More
    Home Culture Theatre

    Theatre

    Checkmate or blunder? Adapting “The Queen’s Gambit” for the musical stage

    "To adapt such a complex series into a musical would be to severely undermine the weight of each of these topics and in turn, the production would do no justice to the character of Beth Harmon and the communities she represents." Beth Ranasinghe considers the obstacles in the path of adapting the hit Netflix show for the musical stage.

    Review: Romeo and Juliet at the National Theatre

    "Why stage Romeo and Juliet a year into a global pandemic? Godwin’s primary response to the pandemic appears to be the focus on touch in the production: it reminds us of the power of human contact, and the depth of feeling that can only be experienced in person." Katie Kirkpatrick reviews the new National Theatre production of Shakespeare's classic tragedy, Romeo and Juliet.

    “If a book is well written, I always find it too short”: Our Ongoing Love Affair with Pride and Prejudice

    "In Being Mr Wickham, Lukis and Curzon have had relatively free reign to develop the titular character, given that Austen doesn’t reveal much about Wickham’s past other than his involvement with Darcy." Beth Proctor discusses the latest left-field adaptation of Jane Austen's classic.

    Review: Spoon River Anthology

    "In a year with little to no available theatrical resources, the production team of Spoon River managed to create a magical experience of many intersecting forms of artistic talent telling important stories. From the editing of the audio file to the curation of the journal, the performance flowed seamlessly from sense to sense."

    Modern musicals and new writing: where did musical theatre leave off?

    CW: Addiction, rape, homophobia, conversion therapy, depression. "While the apparent lack of original musicals can feel disheartening, there’s actually a lot of original work out there." Katie Kirkpatrick looks at the state of new musical theatre.

    Narratives of Grief: Creating ‘Opera for One’

    This is a strength of the performance: with a range of experiences of grief explored by a variety of composers and librettists, no one singular experience is presented, but instead the performance looks at the nuances of the emotions of grieving.

    Making “Magic”: A Revival of an Edwardian Fantasy-Genre Play

    Magic lends itself well to the online format. It is a play of voices, of witty exchanges and mystifying, unseen events. The audience is called on to construct the setting from their imagination, inspired by the actors and the sound effects, resulting in a final product which is a collaboration between players and listeners.

    Fun Home?

    CW: sexual assault, child abuse, suicide, homophobia. 2015 was a great year in the history of musical theatre, possibly the greatest year of this century...