From Greta Thunberg’s resounding message to Extinction Rebellions protests and strikes, there has been a major revolution in the way we think and talk about climate change. Every aspect of our lives has become linked to the climate change dialogue in some way, whether it be the food we eat, the clothes we buy, or the companies we support. The general public is growing more and more aware to how climate change impacts our lives at all levels.

    Anthroposphere, Oxford’s Climate Review, embodies the shift as an interdisciplinary journal, which looks at climate change through the lens of not only science, technology, and policy, but also of history, popular culture, literature, and the arts. Released termly, it features material from people of a broad set of backgrounds and interests on four continents, all wrapped  in a beautiful artistic package. Whether it be a feature on the detriments of the Greek mining industry or food security for native Fijians, each article delves into the impacts, seeking to expose climate change as an undercurrent to daily life.

       Anthroposphere has grown into an international publication which draws readers, writers, and editors from across four continents.  Started in Oxford in 2018, it is the first interdisciplinary climate magazine produced by university students. The staff believe that the magazine’s goals are strengthened by greater diversity of perspective and are working with students and young people from California to the Philippines to spread climate writing opportunities. 

Anthroposphere hopes that its accessible prose and style will mean a broad audience will be enticed to pick it up and engage with the daily experience of  climate change, from its scientifically attributed impacts to the most local and personal experiences. The climate revolution cannot fizzle: too much rests on pushing back against the status quo. Anthroposphere hopes it can be a small part of keeping that ember burning.