Cherwell

Single Reviews

The Get Up Kids – Guilt Show – Out Now Don’t be fooled by its ominous name and gloomy collection
of song titles (‘Martyr Me’, ‘Sick In Her
Skin’, ‘The Dark Night Of The Soul’ etc). Contrary
to the grim foreboding such nu-metal sounding titles inspire,
Guilt Show delivers a hopeful and uplifting sound – not
unoriginal, but so perfectly formulated, so clear in all that it
aspires to be, that it sounds instantly familiar (sing along
optional). This is without doubt pop punk at its unashamed,
melodious and youthful best, but there is also evidence of a
maturing sound and outlook from The Get Up Kids’ fourth
studio album. Broad lyrical themes, instrumental forays and
increased stylistic diversity do not dilute the punk potency of
this band, but push them away from it to new heights. The Get Up
Kids are sure to be big with the current popularity of the genre,
and on the basis of this first offering, really deserve it. This
album has an effervescent yet sincere tone. Sunshine with just
enough shade. NATASHA IBBOTSON Young Heart Attack – Mouthful of Love – Out Now Having first made their mark at the increasingly essential
South By Southwest music convention, Texan six-piece Young Heart
Attack’s debut album promises rock “to lose your
virginity to” – a proposition Cherwell finds
frightening. While the amps set to 11, greasy long hair and giant
guitar riffs are nothing new (AC/DC for the 21st Century
anybody?), Mouthful of Lovehas enough playful energy to suggest a
strong future. The glam-rock flavour of ‘Starlight’ is
lifted above the ordinary by the repartee of boy-girl vocalists
Chris Hodge and Justin Hawkins’ gal-pal Jennifer Stephens.
This vocal pairing create enough sexual frisson to power a small
gig venue. If there is a criticism to be made, it is that the
album is rather unrelenting in its pace, deadening the impact of
the later songs. The highlight is, rather inevitably,
breakthrough single ‘Misty Rowe’, which ends the album
amid a flurry of feedback, leaving the listener reeling. MIKE
JAKEMAN Gomez – Split the Difference – Out 17/05/04 After winning a Mercury Music Prize in 1998 for their debut
album, this British quintet’s arrival was seen as a
much-needed revolution of the tired indie-rock scene (swiftly
becoming the dying indie-rock scene, in the absence of original
talent). This is their fourth album, and their so-far-so-good
musical history has produced a lot to live up to. The Gomez
fanbase has been waiting with baited breath, and the band is
happy to oblige. The diversity of sounds on the album is
striking, combining smoky vocals on one track with guttural
sounds on the next. The upbeat tempo of the opening track is a
deceptive introduction, since it is hotly pursued by the
melodious tones of violins in ‘Sweet Virginia’ and the
twanging guitars of ‘Catch Me Up’. This engaging
mixture keeps the eager listener full of anticipation, and this
album doesn’t disappoint. Not just one for the expectant
Gomez fans, this soft-rock surprise will appeal to many, and just
goes to show rock is still very much alive. KATE TOLLEY Young Heart Attack – Mouthful of Love – Out Now
Having first made their mark at the increasingly essential South By Southwest music convention, Texan six-piece Young Heart Attack’s debut album promises rock “to lose your virginity to” – a proposition Cherwell finds frightening. While the amps set to 11, greasy long hair and giant guitar riffs are nothing new (AC/DC for the 21st Century anybody?), Mouthful of Lovehas enough playful energy to suggest a strong future. The glam-rock flavour of ‘Starlight’ is lifted above the ordinary by the repartee of boy-girl vocalists Chris Hodge and Justin Hawkins’ gal-pal Jennifer Stephens. This vocal pairing create enough sexual frisson to power a small gig venue. If there is a criticism to be made, it is that the album is rather unrelenting in its pace, deadening the impact of the later songs. The highlight is, rather inevitably, breakthrough single ‘Misty Rowe’, which ends the album amid a flurry of feedback, leaving the listener reeling. MIKE JAKEMAN
Gomez – Split the Difference – Out 17/05/04
After winning a Mercury Music Prize in 1998 for their debut album, this British quintet’s arrival was seen as a much-needed revolution of the tired indie-rock scene (swiftly becoming the dying indie-rock scene, in the absence of original talent). This is their fourth album, and their so-far-so-good musical history has produced a lot to live up to. The Gomez fanbase has been waiting with baited breath, and the band is happy to oblige. The diversity of sounds on the album is striking, combining smoky vocals on one track with guttural sounds on the next. The upbeat tempo of the opening track is a deceptive introduction, since it is hotly pursued by the melodious tones of violins in ‘Sweet Virginia’ and the twanging guitars of ‘Catch Me Up’. This engaging mixture keeps the eager listener full of anticipation, and this album doesn’t disappoint. Not just one for the expectant Gomez fans, this soft-rock surprise will appeal to many, and just goes to show rock is still very much alive. KATE TOLLEYARCHIVE: 0th week TT 2004