Autumn Releases

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That’s your lot, summer is over, and as you creep back to work and the nights grow long and cold, it’s easy to feel a little down. But fear not! Michaelmas heralds many new releases, and Cherwell has weeded out the best. Who needs to go outside anyway?
Anonymous
If you’re planning on attending the Union this term you may as well see director Roland Emmerich speak –  and what better preparation than his latest feature? Moving away from his usual disaster movie comfort zone, Emmerich questions the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays.
Johnny English Reborn
I must profess a certain weakness for the original Johnny English, hence the inclusion on this list of the remake. It won’t beat the original, but Rowan Atkinson is on board, which assures a certain level of quality in my book. The hapless spy returns from exile for more slapstick fun .
Tyrannosaur
This is actor Paddy Considine’s first writer/director credit, and looks set to be pretty harrowing, full of violence and domestic abuse. Peep Show’s Olivia Colman stars in an unusual straight role.
Puss in Boots
The only really decent thing to come out of the later Shrek films, Antonio Banderas’ ferocious feline finally gets his own vehicle. Expect celebrity cameos and pop-culture references galore.
A Very Harold and 
Kumar Christmas
The solid stoner comedy series gets a third outing, with Neil Patrick Harris mysteriously returning from the dead. Kal Penn and John Cho are reliable leads.
Melancholia
With the current furore over director Lars von Trier’s ‘Nazi’ comments at the Cannes festival, there’s more than one reason to take an interest in his latest film, which centres on two sisters’ attempts to come to terms with the oncoming apocalypse. 
We Need To Talk About Kevin
There’s a lot of buzz surrounding this release, which was highly praised at Cannes. Another grim one, it follows Tilda Swinton as the mother of a boy who massacres his schoolmates.
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part One
The tremendously popular Stephenie Meyer adaptation begins to end – and Edward and Bella finally get it on!
Hugo
Partially intriguing just to see how Martin Scorcese handles a family film, Hugo centres on a young orphan boy living in a train station, and includes elements related to the foundation of cinema and a mysterious robot.

That’s your lot, summer is over, and as you creep back to work and the nights grow long and cold, it’s easy to feel a little down. But fear not! Michaelmas heralds many new releases, and Cherwell has weeded out the best. Who needs to go outside anyway?

Anonymous

If you’re planning on attending the Union this term you may as well see director Roland Emmerich speak –  and what better preparation than his latest feature? Moving away from his usual disaster movie comfort zone, Emmerich questions the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays.

Johnny English Reborn

I must profess a certain weakness for the original Johnny English, hence the inclusion on this list of the remake. It won’t beat the original, but Rowan Atkinson is on board, which assures a certain level of quality in my book. The hapless spy returns from exile for more slapstick fun.

Tyrannosaur

This is actor Paddy Considine’s first writer/director credit, and looks set to be pretty harrowing, full of violence and domestic abuse. Peep Show’s Olivia Colman stars in an unusual straight role.

Puss in Boots

The only really decent thing to come out of the later Shrek films, Antonio Banderas’ ferocious feline finally gets his own vehicle. Expect celebrity cameos and pop-culture references galore.

A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas

The solid stoner comedy series gets a third outing, with Neil Patrick Harris mysteriously returning from the dead and Kal Penn and John Cho as reliable leads.

Melancholia

With the current furore over director Lars von Trier’s ‘Nazi’ comments at the Cannes festival, there’s more than one reason to take an interest in his latest film, which centres on two sisters’ attempts to come to terms with the oncoming apocalypse. 

We Need To Talk About Kevin

There’s a lot of buzz surrounding this release, which was highly praised at Cannes. Another grim one, it follows Tilda Swinton as the mother of a boy who massacres his schoolmates.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part One

The tremendously popular Stephenie Meyer adaptation begins to end – and Edward and Bella finally get it on!

Hugo

Partially intriguing just to see how Martin Scorcese handles a family film, Hugo centres on a young orphan boy living in a train station, and includes elements related to the foundation of cinema and a mysterious robot.

 

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