Ital is certainly versatile. The chameleon producer has played guitar in a high energy post-hardcore band, provided vocals for a weirdly funked up punk group, and is now a solo producer under various monikers. But a word of caution before we continue; this is without a doubt a house album, and as such it’s full merit is somewhat difficult to appreciate on a bright weekday afternoon sitting in my bedroom.
Right from the off, Ital (or Daniel Martin-McCormick) showcases his funky heritage with a syncopated number that features a chopped up vocal sample and sci-fi synth lines. To its detriment however, it lasts almost eight minutes, and once the initial curiosity fades, it just drags. Indeed the weakness of this five track EP is its length; three tracks, each over ten minutes long is not only excessive, but also difficult to pull off. McCormick only vaguely manages it, and it’s telling that my favourite track ‘Floridian Void’ is the shortest.
Now on to one of those ten minute tunes. ‘Privacy Settings’ lifts the mood with a classic house approach reminiscent of MJ Cole’s funkier moments. Its midsection even executes a dubstep-ish bass drop briefly. And to be honest, the closer is just too similar to the previous tracks to justify another ten minutes of listening time. Ultimately, the cons outweigh the pros here. Diverse, slick, and conceptually sound versus long, repetitive, lacklustre … and repetitive again. 

Ital is certainly versatile. The chameleon producer has played guitar in a high energy post-hardcore band, provided vocals for a weirdly funked up punk group, and is now a solo producer under various monikers. But a word of caution before we continue; this is without a doubt a house album, and as such it’s full merit is somewhat difficult to appreciate on a bright weekday afternoon sitting in my bedroom.

Right from the off, Ital (or Daniel Martin-McCormick) showcases his funky heritage with a syncopated number that features a chopped up vocal sample and sci-fi synth lines. To its detriment however, it lasts almost eight minutes, and once the initial curiosity fades, it just drags. Indeed the weakness of this five track EP is its length; three tracks, each over ten minutes long is not only excessive, but also difficult to pull off. McCormick only vaguely manages it, and it’s telling that my favourite track ‘Floridian Void’ is the shortest.

Now on to one of those ten minute tunes. ‘Privacy Settings’ lifts the mood with a classic house approach reminiscent of MJ Cole’s funkier moments. Its midsection even executes a dubstep-ish bass drop briefly. And to be honest, the closer is just too similar to the previous tracks to justify another ten minutes of listening time. Ultimately, the cons outweigh the pros here. Diverse, slick, and conceptually sound versus long, repetitive, lacklustre … and repetitive again.