Fashion in the latter half of the 2010s was defined by the unprecedented cross-contamination of streetwear with the old luxury houses, of the casual with the couture. Runway shows lost their focus on tailoring, Gucci’s tracksuits became more popular than their lounge suits, and Balenciaga opted for market-redefining chunky sneakers instead of dress shoes. Louis Vuitton appointed the face of “hypebeast” culture as their creative director. The often unapproachable sphere of “high” fashion was infringed upon as never before and became less intimidating for it.

The pendulum has begun to swing back towards its centre now, but something has changed, perhaps permanently. The tailoring which is re-asserting itself more often than not feels less at home in a board meeting than in the club. Many of the a-traditional cuts seen gracing the runways over the last season or two are better paired with Air Forces than with derbies. Conversely, streetwear labels like Off-White and A-COLD-WALL* have begun to trade overtly branded hoodies for the subtleties of suiting, albeit suiting with an un-sartorial edge.

Cherwell Fashion’s first photo editorial of Hilary Term 2020 aims to reflect the potential found in this style of tailoring which has kicked off the new decade: more wearable, more versatile, less fitted, more colourful. All the confidence a good suit can give you with none of the inhibitive stiffness. What’s more, these looks, mostly comprised of vintage shop finds and affordable brands, show that suiting doesn’t need to break the bank to look good.

Models: Oli Lloyd Williams, Rory Wilson, Sophie Gull, Katy Holland, Emily Pogue

Photography and words: Alec Holt